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Colorado Center of Orthopaedic Excellence Blog

Tips and advice for sports injuries and general orthopedic conditions rss


How Chiropractic Care Can Worsen Your Hip Pain

How Chiropractic Care Can Worsen Your Hip Pain

by Alex Hirsch (SU)
When you’re experiencing moderate to severe hip pain, you just want the hurting to stop. So, in an effort to avoid surgery, you may try all sorts of alternative treatments.

Doctors' Tips and Tricks for Relieving Hip Pain

Doctors' Tips and Tricks for Relieving Hip Pain

by Alex Hirsch (SU)
Hip pain can affect daily life, making it difficult to walk, climb stairs, bend over, or even sit down comfortably.

Orthopedic Tests for Hip and Pelvic Problems

Orthopedic Tests for Hip and Pelvic Problems

by Holly (SU)
Pain of the hip and pelvic area is one of the most frequent types of joint pain seen by orthopedic doctors.

Recovering from My Broken Hip

Recovering from My Broken Hip

by Shearly (SU)
Getting a broken hip is like slamming the brake pedal on your life. The recovery process may take months and will likely require making accommodations in your plans. While recovering from a broken hip can take a while, there are many things you can do to make the recovery period go well.

FAQs for Your Orthopedic Surgeon Before Hip Surgery

FAQs for Your Orthopedic Surgeon Before Hip Surgery

by Yenny (SU)
If you need hip surgery, it’s important to have as much information about the procedure, recovery and what kind of outcome you may expect. In addition to researching a practice and the surgeon’s reputation, these are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) for your orthopedic surgeon before having hip surgery.

Recovering from Hip Dislocation

Recovering from Hip Dislocation

by Stephanie Meadows
A hip dislocation is a serious and painful injury. It is usually the result of some very strong trauma, as in the case of an automobile accident or a fall. When the smooth end of the femur, or thigh bone, is pushed out of the socket formed by the pelvis, the hip joint is said to be dislocated. Emergency treatment is necessary for this injury, and a healthy recovery is vital towards returning mobility and preventing chronic pain.

Hip Dislocations 101: What You Should Know

Hip Dislocations 101: What You Should Know

by Yenny (SU)
It usually takes a traumatic injury – like being in a car accident or falling from a significant height – to cause a hip dislocation. And if or when it happens, it’s a serious medical emergency requiring immediate treatment. While the initial treatment is quick, it isn’t without pain, and there is often a long recovery time.

Hip Replacement vs Hip Resurfacing

Hip Replacement vs Hip Resurfacing

by Stephanie Meadows
We don’t think about how much wear and tear our musculoskeletal system takes on a daily basis, especially our hips. As we age, everyday use wears down the bones and cartilage inside the hip joint. This natural degeneration of the bones and cartilage inside the hip is the cause of one of the most common condition affecting the hip, called osteoarthritis. This is a painful condition that causes severe chronic pain, stiffness in the joint, and limited mobility, which inhibits people from going about their daily tasks and activities. The good news, is that surgical procedures such as hip replacement or resurfacing help man people restore function and mobility, reducing the pain caused by bone on bone friction in the hip.

The Benefits of Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

The Benefits of Minimally Invasive Hip Replacement

by Stephanie Meadows
The hip is a major joint. During a total hip replacement, which is typically an invasive procedure, the surgeon removes the top of the femur, or thigh bone, and replaces it with an artificial stem and ball, made of ceramic, metal, or plastic – inserted into the hip socket.

Proper Sports Techniques to Prevent Hip Pain

Proper Sports Techniques to Prevent Hip Pain

by Stephanie Meadows
The hip joint is one the large joints of the body and serves in movement as the thigh moves forward and backward. The hip joint also rotates when sitting and with changes of direction when walking. The hip joint is where the ball of the thigh bone (femur) joins the pelvis at a socket called the acetabulum. There is cartilage covering both the bone of the femur and the acetabulum of the pelvis in the hip joint. A joint lining tissue, called synovium, surrounds the hip joint. The synovium tissue produces fluid that lubricates the joint and provides nutrients to the cartilage of the joint.